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Thursday, July 09, 2015

Learn Nihon : Vocabulary (2/2)

~ wa doko desuka.
~はどこですか。
Where is ~?
Koko kara tooi desu ka.
ここから遠いですか。
Is it far from here? 
Massugu itte kudasai.
まっすぐ行ってください。
Please go straight.
Migi ni magatte kudasai.
右に曲がってください。
Please turn right.
 ....

koko
ここ
here
soko
そこ
there
asoko
あそこ
that over there
migi
right
hidari
left
massugu
まっすぐ
straight
mae
front
ushiro
後ろ
behind
yoko
side
tonari
next to
mukai
向かい
cross
tooi
遠い
far
chikai
近い
near
 
higashi
east
nishi
西
west
minami
south
kita
north
iro
colors
ao
blue
aka
red
chairo
茶色
brown
daidaiiro
橙色
orange
haiiro
灰色
gray
kiiro
黄色
yellow
kimidori
黄緑
light green
kuro
black
midori
green
mizuiro
水色
light blue
momoiro
桃色
pink
murasaki
purple
shiro
white
Sukina iro wa nan desu ka.
好きな色は何ですか。
What is your favorite color?
 dfgdgdfdgf
aka  red
daidai orange
ki yellow
midori green
ao blue
ai indigo
murasaki  violet
dsdssds
apaato
アパート
apartment
biiru
ビール
beer
puuru
プール
pool
keeki
ケーキ
cake
koohii
コーヒー
coffee
dadasadsd

Ashita yuki ga furu kana.
明日雪が降るかな。
I wonder if it will snow tomorrow.
Ano hito wa supein-jin kana.
あの人はスペイン人かな。
I wonder if he/she is Spanish. 
"~ kashira (~かしら)" can be replaced with "~ kana", though it is used only by females.











Kore ikura kashira.
これいくらかな。
I wonder how much it is.
Dou shita no kashira.
どうしたのかしら。
I wonder what happened.
Here are some more phrases with "~ kana" from my "Phrase of the Day" lessons.
Nani o kite ikou kana.
何を着ていこうかな。
What shall I wear?
Mattete kureru kana.
待っててくれるかな。
I wonder if he/she will wait for me.
Machiawase-basho machigaeta kana.
待ち合わせ場所間違えたかな。
I wonder if I am waiting
in the wrong place.
Okane, ato ikura nokotteru kana.
お金、後いくら残ってるかな。
I wonder how much money I have left.
Rainen wa ii koto aru kana.
来年はいいことあるかな。
I wonder if next year will bring
something good. 
cscsssc

nani
what
kite
着て
the te-form of
the verb "kiru (to wear)"
ikou
行こう
volitional form of
the verb "iku (to go)"
xxxxxxxx
osokunaru
遅くなる
to be late for
Notes
"~ sou (da)" expresses the speaker's speculation. It translates into "look," "seem," "feel like" etc.
machiawase-basho
待ち合わせ場所
the place for waiting
machigaeru
間違える
to be wrong
 
dsdsdsd
mou
もう
soon
kuru
来る
to come
hazu
はず
be expected to
 dsds
ato
あと
later
go-fun
五分
five minutes
matou
待とう
volitional form of
the verb "matsu (to wait)"
 sfsfdf
okureru
遅れる
to be late
gomen
ごめん
I am sorry.
hfhfhf
matteite
待っていて
the te-form of
 "matteiru (to be waiting)"
arigatou
ありがとう
Thank you.
sfsfsfsf
shinpai suru
心配する
to be anxious
Notes
"Yo (よ)" is a sentence ending particle which indicates moderate emphasis. "~ shichatta (~しちゃった)" is a colloquial way of saying "~ shite shimatta (~してしまった)." Click here for the usage of "~ chau (~ chatta)." "Shinpai shichatta yo (心配しちゃったよ )" sounds feminine, therefore a male speaker would likely say "Shinpai shita zo (心配したぞ)" instead. 
sonnani
そんなに
so much, like that
okoru
怒る
to get angry
"Okoranaide (怒らないで)" is the negative te-form of the verb "okoru (怒る)." "Yo (よ)" is a sentence ending particle which indicates moderate emphasis. "Okoranaide yo (怒らないでよ)" sounds feminine, therefore a male speaker would likely say "Okoruna yo (怒るなよ)" instead. 
 

Koko chotto mite ittemo ii?

Do you mind if I look in this store
for a minute?

koko
ここ
here
chotto
ちょっと
for a moment
miru
見る
to look
Notes
"Mite (見て)" is the te-form of the verb "miru (見る)." "~ te mo ii (~てもいい)" is a phrase which expresses permission. Click here to learn other usages of "chotto (ちょっと)."


Tsukarechatta.

I am tired.

tsukareru
疲れる
to get tired
Notes
"~ chatta (~ちゃった)" is a colloquial way of saying "~ te shimatta (~てしまった)." Click here to learn the usage of "~ chau (~ chatta)." "Tsukarechatta (疲れちゃった)" sounds feminine or childish, therefore a male speaker would likely say "tsukareta (疲れた)" or "tsukareta na (疲れたな)" instead. 

Ocha shinai?

Shall we stop for tea?
o-cha
お茶
tea
Notes
"O (お)" is the prefix used to express politeness. Click here to learn more about the prefix "o (お)" "Shinai (しない)" is the informal negative form of the verb "suru (to do)." With rising intonation, it expresses an invitation. In formal situations, "shimasen ka (しませんか)" is used. 
In English, "go for coffee" is a commonly used phrase, but the word "o-cha (tea)" is normally used in Japanese whether you are having tea or coffee.

Tsugi wa doko e ikou ka.

Where should we go next?
tsugi
next
doko
どこ
where
iku
行く
to go
Notes
"Ikou (行こう)" is the volitional form of the verb "iku (行く)."

Eiga demo miru?

How about a movie?
eiga
映画
movie
miru
見る
to watch
Notes
"Demo (でも)" is used in casually mentioning something as a suggestion. It translates into "~ or something." In informal situations, a plain form of the verb can be used as a question with a rising intonation.  

Shokuji shiyou.

Let's go eat.
shokuji
食事
meal
suru
する
to do
Notes
"Shiyou (しよう)" is the volitional form of the verb "suru (する)."

Sushi nanka dou?

Do you feel like sushi?
dou
どう
how
Notes
"Nanka (なんか)" is a colloquial way of saying "nado (など)." It indicates a tentative suggestion and translates into "or something." Click here to learn expressions including fish.

Chuuka ryouri no hou ga ii.

I'd rather have Chinese food.

chuuka ryouri
中華料理
Chinese food
ii
いい
good
Notes
There are no comparative forms of adjectives and adverbs in Japanese. When comparing two items, the expression "[A] no hou ga [B] yori ~" is used. "[B] yori ~" may be omitted if it is clear from the context. 

Okane, ato ikura
nokotteru kana.

I wonder how much money I have left.
okane
お金
money
ato
the rest
ikura
いくら
how much
nokoru
残る
to be left
Notes
"~ kana (~かな)" can be translated as "I wonder ~" in English. Click here to learn more about the expression "~ kana (~かな)."

Yokatta, juubun aru.

Good, I have plenty.
yoi
良い
good
juubun
充分
enough
aru
ある
to have
Notes
"Yokatta (よかった)" is the past tense of the adjective "ii (いい)." Click here to learn about adjectives. 

Shimatta, tarinai kamo.

Shoot, I might need more than this.

Shimatta, tarinai kamo.

Shoot, I might need more than this.

Warikan ni shinai?

Why don't I pay half?
warikan ni suru
割り勘にする
split the account
Notes
"Shinai (しない)" is the informal negative form of the verb "suru (to do)." With rising intonation, it expresses an invitation. In formal situations, "shimasen ka (しませんか)" is used. 

Mou juuichi-ji sugi da.

It's 11 o'clock already!
mou
もう
already
juuichi-ji
十一時
eleven o'clock
~ sugi
~過ぎ
past, after
fsf

Kaeranakucha.

I have to go home.
kaeru
帰る
to return
Notes
"~ nakucha (~なくちゃ)" is a colloquial way of saying "~ nakereba naranai (~なければならない)" or "~ nai to ikenai (~ないといけない)." It translates into "must." It sounds feminine and childish.  

Okutte ikou ka.

Shall I walk you home?
okuru
送る
to escort home
Notes
"Ikou (いこう)" is the volitional form of the verb "iku (to go)." "Ka (か)" is a sentence ending particle which makes a sentence into a question.

Nande konnani
doki doki shichau n darou.

Why am I so nervous?
nande
なんで
why
konnani
こんなに
like this, in this way
doki doki
ドキドキ
pit-a-pat
Notes
"Doki doki (ドキドキ)" is one of the onomatopoeic expressions. It describes increase heart beat caused by exercise or nervousness. Onomatopoeic expressions are often written in katakana, though they are not foreign words. Click here to learn more about them. 
"~ shichau (~しちゃう)" is a colloquial way of saying "~ shite shimau (~してしまう)." Click here for the usage of "~ chau (~ちゃう)." 
"~ darou (~だろう)" is used when guessing with doubt. These expressions are close to "I wonder ~" in English. Click here to learn about expressions of uncertainty.

Kaeritakunai na.

I don't want to go home.

kaeru
帰る
to return
Notes
"~ takunai (~たくない)" is the negative form of  "~ tai (~たい)." It expresses a desire to do something. Click here to learn about expressions of desire. "Na (な)" is a sentence ending particle which indicates casual emphasis.

Zutto isshoni itai.

I wish we could be together forever.
zutto
ずっと
all the time
isshoni
一緒に
together
iru
いる
to stay
Notes
"~ tai (~たい)" expresses desire to do something.

Chotto yotte ikanai?

Would you like to come over to
my place for a while?
chotto
ちょっと
for a while
yotte
寄って
the te-form of the verb
"yoru (to drop in)"
iku
行く
to go
Notes
"Ikanai (いかない)" is the informal negative form of the verb "iku (to go)." With rising intonation, it expresses an invitation. In formal situations, "ikimasen ka (いきませんか)" is used. 

Doushiyou?

What should I do?
dou
どう
what, how
shiyou
しよう
the volitional form of
the verb "suru (to do)"
Notes
"Dousuru (どうする)" is "What are you going to do?" 

Kyou wa tanoshikatta.

I had a good time today.
kyou
今日
today
tanoshii
楽しい
enjoyable
Notes
"Tanoshikatta (楽しかった)" is the past tense of the adjective "tanoshii (楽しい)."

Kondo, itsu aeru?

When can I see you again?
kondo
今度
next time
itsu
いつ
when
aeru
会える
the potential form of
the verb "au (to meet)"
jlj

Kinyoubi ni
konsaato ni ikanai?

Would you like to go to a concert on Friday?
kinyoubi
金曜日
Friday
konsaato
コンサート
concert
iku
行く
to go
Notes
Click here to learn vocabulary for the days of the week.
Since "konsaato (コンサート)" is from the English word "concert," it is written in katakana.
"Ikanai (行かない)" is the informal negative form of the verb "iku (to go)." With rising intonation, it expresses an invitation. In formal situations, "ikimasen ka (行きませんか)" is used. 

Kanojo shika inai!

I think she is the one for me!
kanojo
彼女
she
shika
しか
only
inai
いない
the negative form
of the verb "iru (to exist)"
Notes
"He is the one" is "Kare shika inai (彼しかいない)." 

Kaimono ni ikou.

Let's go shopping.
kaimono
買い物
shopping
ikou
行こう
the volitional form of
the verb "iku (to go)"
Notes
"Ni (に)" is a particle which indicates the direction. It translates into "to".

Ano mise de
baagen yatteru yo.

That shop is having a sale.
ano
あの
that
mise
store, shop
baagen
バーゲン
bargain
yaru
やる
to hold

Since "baagen (バーゲン)" is from the English word "bargain," it is written in katakana
"~ yatteru (~やってる)" is a colloquial way of saying "~ yatteiru (~やっている)." "~ iru (~いる)" is combined with the te-form of a verb and expresses an action in progress or state of completion of an action. 
"Yo (よ)" is a sentence ending particle which emphasizes a statement.

Seetaa ga hoshii na.

I want to get a sweater.
seetaa
セーター
sweater
hoshii
欲しい
to want
Notes
Since "seetaa (セーター)" is from the English word "sweater," it is written in katakana
"Na (な)" is a sentence ending particle which places a casual emphasis on a opinion.
Click here to learn about expressions of desire.

Sore yoku niau yo.

That looks nice on you. 
sore
それ
that
yoku
よく
well, nicely
niau
似合う
to suit
hj

Kawanai to koukaisuru
kamo shirenai.

If I don't get it, I might regret it. 
kawanai
買わない
the negative form of
the verb "kau (to buy)"
koukaisuru
後悔する
to regert
Notes
"To (と)" is placed after an adjective or a verb to create a conditional. 
"~ kamoshirenai (~かもしれない)" indicates the speaker's guess and translates into "might." 

Kore kite mite mo ii?

Can I try this on?
kore
これ
this
kitemiru
着てみる
to try on
Notes
"Mite (みて) " is the te-form of the verb "miru (みる)." "~ te mo ii (~てもいい)" is a phrase which expresses permission.

Kore kiru nara
daietto shinakucha.

I'll have to go on a diet if I want to wear this.
kore
これ
this
kiru
着る
to wear
daietto suru
ダイエットする
to go on a diet
Notes
"~ nara (~なら)" indicates a supposition and result. It translates into "if ~ then."
"~ nakucha (~なくちゃ)" is a colloquial way of saying "~ nakereba naranai (~なければならない)" or "~ nai to ikenai (~ないといけない)." It translates into "must." It sounds feminine and childish.  

Yappari yametokou.

I don't think I will get it.
yappari
やっぱり
after all
yameru
やめる
to give up
Notes
"yametokou (やめとこう)" is a colloquial way of saying "yameteoku (やめておく)." "~ oku (~おく)" is combined with the te-form of the verb and means "do something in advance for future convenience."

Docchi no iro ga
niau to omou?

Which color do you think looks better on me?
docchi
どっち
which
iro
color
niau
似合う
to suit
omou
思う
to think
Notes
"Docchi (どっち)" is a colloquial way of saying "dochira (どちら)." 

Mou ikken dake mite miyou. 

I am going to try one more store. 
mou
もう
more
dake
だけ
only
mitemiru
見てみる
to try to look
Notes
"Ken (軒)" is a counter for houses or stores. "Mitemiyou (見てみよう)" is the volitional form of "mitemiru (見てみる)."

Iikagen ni shite yo. 

Oh, come on! 
"Iikagen ni shinasai (いい加減にしなさい)" or "Iikagen ni shite (いい加減にして)" can be translated as "That's enough" or "No more ~." Male speakers would say "Iikagen ni shiro yo (いい加減にしろよ)" or "Iikagen ni shiro (いい加減にし

Dore ni shitara iika wakaranai. 

I can't make a decision. 
dore
どれ
which
wakaranai
分からない
I don't know
Notes
"Wakaranai (分からない)" is the negative form of the verb "wakaru (to know)."

ろ)". 

Fuku nante kirereba ii noni. 

Clothes are just something to put on.  
fuku
clothes
nante
なんて
such as
kireru
着れる
the potential form of
the verb "kiru (to wear)'
ii
いい
fine
Notes
"~ ba (~ば)" presents a condition that would result in the clause that follows. "~ noni (~のに)" is used at the end of a sentence, and indicates a feeling of dissatisfaction. 

Takaku temo ii n da. 

I don't care about price. 
takai
高い
expensive
ii
いい
fine
Notes
"~ temo (~ても)" translates into "even if." "~ n da (~んだ)" is an informal form of "~ no da (~のだ)." It is used when the speaker is explaining or asking for an explanation about information shared with the listener. Click here to learn more about "~ n da (n desu)."

Omoikitte kore kaou kana. 

I think I'll take the plunge and get this. 
omoikitte
思い切って
in a decisive manner
kore
これ
this
kaou
買おう
the volitional form of
the verb "kau (to buy)"

Kore katte kureru? 

Would you buy this for me? 
kore
これ
expensive
katte
買って
the te-form of
the verb "kau (to buy)"
Notes
When "~ kureru (~くれる)" is combined with the verb "te-form," it means "do something for me (or someone)."

Arigatou.
Kore hoshikatta n da. 

Thank you. I wanted to get this.  
arigatou
ありがとう
Thank you
kore
これ
this
hoshikatta
欲しかった
the past tense of
"hoshii (to want)"
Notes
"~ n da (~んだ)" is an informal form of "~ no da (のだ)." It is used when the speaker is explaining or asking for an explanation about inform

Kyuuka zutto tanoshimi ni
shiteta n da. 

I've been looking forward to the vacation. 
kyyuka
休暇
holidays
zutto
ずっと
all the time
tanoshimi ni suru
楽しみにする
to hope for
Notes
"~ n da(~んだ)" is an informal form of "~ no da(~のだ)." It is used when the speaker is explaining or asking for an explanation about information shared with the listener.

Mou kyuuka kibun. 

I feel like I'm on vacation already. 
mou
もう
already
kyuuka
休暇
holidays
kibun
気分
feeling, mood

Ichinen nante
atto iu ma da ne.  

It seems like the year flew by. 
ichinen
一年
a year
nante
なんて
such as
atto iu ma
あっという間
in no time
Notes
"Ne (ね)" is a sentence ending particle. It indicates that the speaker wants the listener to agree or confirm.

Rainen wa ii koto aru kana. 

I wonder if next year will bring
something good. 
rainen
来年
next year
ii
いい
good
koto
こと
thing
aru
ある
to happen

Ii toshi datta na.  

It's been a good year.

ii
いい
good
toshi
year
Notes
"Na (な)" is a sentence ending particle which expresses emotion.

Oomisoka wa dokutoku no
fun'iki ga aru ne.  

New Year's Eve puts people
in a special mood. 
oomisoka
大晦日
New Year's Eve
dokutokuno
独特の
peculiar, special
fun'iki
雰囲気
atmosphere
aru
ある
to have

Akemashite omedetou. 

Happy New Year!

Shinnen no chikai tateta? 

Did you make a New Year's resolution?  
shinnen
新年
New Year
chikai o tateru
誓いをたてる
make an oath
Notes
"tateta (たてた)" is the past tense of the verb "tateru (たてる)."

Kotoshi koso wa
kin'en suru zo! 

I am going to stop smoking this year!
kotoshi
今年
this year
kin'en suru
禁煙する
quit smoking
Notes
"~ koso (~こそ)" is a particle which adds emphasis to the word preceding it. "Zo (ぞ)" is a sentence ending particle mostly used by men. It adds force to words of self-encouragement or self-urging. 

Maitoshi onaji koto itteru
youna ki ga suru na. 

It seems like I have same resolutions
every year.
maitoshi
毎年
every year
onaji
同じ
same
koto
こと
thing
~ youna ki ga suru
~ような気がする
feel that ~, seem to ~
Notes
"itteru (言ってる)" is a colloquial way of saying "itteiru (言っている)." When the te-form of the verb and "~ iru (~いる)" are combined, it expresses the present progressive.

Iu wa yasuku
okonau wa katashi. 

Easier said than done.
iu
言う
to say
yasui
易い
easy
okonau
行う
to do, to act
katai
難い
hard
Notes
This is one of the Japanese proverbs.

Donna hatsuyume o mita? 

What was your first dream
of the new year?
donna
どんな
what, what kind of
hatsuyume
初夢
the first dream of
the New Year
mita
見た
the past tense of
the verb "miru (to see)"

Ii toshi ni narimasu youni. 

Here's to happiness during the New Year.
ii
いい
good
toshi
year
narimasu
なります
to turn out
Notes
"~ youni (~ように)" is combined with the formal form (the ~masu form) of the verb and expresses a wish. 









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